Author Archives: Sonja

Central Colombia, Part II: Wax Palms and Giant Car Crashes

We rolled into a hostel in the sweet little town of Salento. It was pouring buckets and the camping area was about 6″ deep in standing water. Dude, we are from SEATTLE; this doesn’t bother us in the slightest. We popped the top of the camper and the kids happily played with legos while we tried to eek out a wifi signal. Chris also took the shortest shower in the history of mankind because the temp started out hot and

Central Colombia, Part I: Zona Cafetera and Jungle Hot Springs.

On this trip we really haven’t given big cities a fair shake. We tend to roll up to the outskirts, take the briefest of peeks into the urban center, and then promptly get the heck out of dodge. We have missed countless museums, fabulous restaurants, and delightful shopping. Example A: Medellin, Colombia.    We had a slightly terrifying drive up to the campground though the city (Google Maps is not our friend – we should have listened to Garmin), tried

Shipping Across the Darien Gap

Hello! I promise we’re still on our trip and trucking south. We’ve been camping almost non-stop since we left Cartagena and the wifi has been spotty at best. Hence the lack of recent blog posts.  Shipping Time!   I’m sure most overlanders dread this process; we certainly felt it hanging over our heads in Costa Rica and Panama. A quick recap: Geography buffs will know that it is impossible to drive the relatively tiny stretch of roadless wilderness between Panama

Long Overdue Update

Hello Dear Friends! Our apologies for the long blog silence. Except for a short stint in Cartagena and a trip to an Amazon jungle lodge, we’ve been out camping in the boonies with poor (if any) internet connections.    We have just entered Chile, after exploring Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia. We will update more as we’re able, although in all honesty we’ve been a bit better on Instagram. That is us on Thanksgiving Day on the Salar de Uyuni,

Panama Canal Zone

After thoroughly enjoying our time in Bocas del Toro, it was time to head south to Panama City and prepare our truck for shipment to Cartagena (Colombia) aboard a giant container ship. Geography buffs will know that it is impossible to drive the relatively tiny stretch of roadless wilderness between Panama and Colombia known as the Darien Gap. Instead you find a buddy with another overland vehicle and you share a cargo container, the same type that is used to

Bocas del Toro: Air

Last Bocas del Toro post! We got out the drone for a little aerial action.   But first a photo from my mother-in-law that she took atop the birding platform. Can’t get enough of them sunsets.     These pictures are from three different locations. #1: The dock at Tranquilo Bay   This is a good shot of the reef close to shore. Nice snorkeling right off the dock, although we may have spent most of our time playing chicken

Bocas del Toro: [Under]Water

I haven’t done any scuba diving since I was rear ended in a car accident a few years ago and consequently suffered a burst disc in my neck and nerve damage in my arm. My left side is pretty weak so for now we’re sticking to snorkeling, which is just fine in a place like Bocas del Toro as much of the coral is in shallow water.    If you take the day trip to Cayo Zapatillas (highly recommended!), bring

The Trip So Far: More Honest Reflections

Here we go, Round 2 of the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of overland travel! Here is Round 1.  The Very Good After a bit of a delay, we were finally able to leave Panama. Hello South America!! We are happily ensconced in a hotel in Cartagena, Colombia. Our truck is safely stowed in a cargo container aboard a ship that sailed from Colon (Panama) and we’ve been tracking it as it lumbers our way. The process of extracting

Bocas del Toro: Water

The best part about the resort is that several excursions were offered to nearby attractions: beaches, coffee plantations, and bat caves on the mainland. I’m sure most people opt to choose all three but we elected to spend all our time lounging on the beach and playing in the water. Coffee is nice….but sand is better!   Our favorite beach was a national park called Cayo Zapatillas, which was about 20 minutes away by boat. We went twice, it was

Trip Highs and Lows

We’ve had a few crazy adventures on this trip; here are the best and the worst plus a few fun stats. (We’ll update these as we go along) Farthest North: Prudhoe Bay/Deadhorse, Alaska Farthest south: To be decided! Ushuaia, Argentina? Hottest: 47.2 Celsius (117°F) Death Valley (previously: 106°F Vacaville, CA) Coldest: 8 Celsius (46.4°F ) Nevado de Toluca, Mexico Highest: 3,730 meters (12,237 ft) Nevado de Toluca Lowest: Badwater Basin 252′ below sea level, Death Valley NP Windiest: TBD Best thunderstorm: El Rollo

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