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Hello and Welcome!

Ronda Kaysen of the New York Times profiled us along with several other worldschooling families in her recent article titled The New Nomads: Have Wifi, Will Travel published on April 15, 2018. Naturally we were thrilled to talk about our adventure, including the trials of living in a 70 square foot camper and our hopes for returning to Seattle. We talked with Ronda back in December 2017; since that time we’ve completed our 20,000 mile road trip from Seattle to

Peru: Machu Picchu, Arequipa, and the Sacred Valley

Back in 2012, when our son Ben was 20 months old (and Emma had not yet made her appearance in the world) we traveled to Peru for two weeks. It was Ben’s first international trip and our introductory visit to South America. It was a great experience: we visited Arequipa, Lake Titicaca, Cusco, the Sacred Valley, and of course, Machu Picchu. In November 2017, when we were roaring through Peru, we elected to bypass the places we’d visited previously, choosing

Peru: Cordillera Blancas

The mountains are calling and we must go. We took a sharp swerve to the east to hit up some of Peru’s most stunningly gorgeous peaks. In Spanish Cordillera Blanca means ‘white range’, although they are still technically part of the Andes chain of mountains that snakes south; the continent’s crooked spine. They also serve as the continental divide. Weirdly, I expect divides to be in the middle of the continent: neatly packaging and sending their watery volumes into equal parts

Northern Peru: Booking it south and avoiding flying trash

Hullo Peru! After a long border crossing from Ecuador we tucked ourselves into a little campspot on the beach for a few days to regroup. The kids make good beach bums. Also! We had our first encounter with Peru’s famous hairless dogs. Not to be confused with Mexican hairless dogs. Peru’s specimens were bred by pre-Incan cultures along the coastal regions  but almost became extinct when the Spaniards arrived.  They are…weird. These guys weren’t completely hairless and had mottled skin

Ecuador: Cotopaxi

We were leaving the dense, steamy Amazon behind and heading for altitude. But first we said goodbye to one of the prettiest waterfalls I’ve ever seen: Cascada San Rafael. I included a photo of it in our previous post but this thing deserves a closer look. It’s stunning.     And then we hit the road and began climbing. We also crossed over the equator, which was a pretty monumental event. Unfortunately, we were told there was an official marker

Ecuador: Exploring the Amazon Jungle

We crossed the border into Ecuador, drove into the oil-field town of Nueva Loja (also called Lago Agrio), and promptly discovered that our hotel had a water slide. So we basically did this for the next eight hours:   But the real reason we were in town was to spend some time in the jungle! Ben has been talking about the Amazon jungle ever since we told the kids we were going to embark on this crazy adventure. This boy

Southern Colombia: Parque Arqueológico De San Agustin

Full disclosure: Mocoa isn’t really southern Colombia. If you have yourself a look at a map of the country, you’ll see that about half of Colombia, including the southeastern-most swath, is the vast roadless wilderness inhabited by the Amazon Jungle. My apologies, dear readers, I’m feeling a bit lazy this morning so the title will stay, despite perhaps not being entirely geographically accurate.  Regardless of its placement, Mocoa is down near the border with Ecuador in a remote part of

Colombia: Tatacoa Desert

Time to hit the dirt! The highway debacle outside of Ibague sent us scurrying for roads that were more lightly traveled. So we headed for a desert that isn’t technically a desert and at various times over the millennia has been a tropical rain forest, a prairie grassland, and several hundred feet underwater. For our two days in the area, it was blisteringly hot with occasional clouds and rain(!), which turned everything a bit swampy. For the record, one of

Central Colombia, Part II: Wax Palms and Giant Car Crashes

We rolled into a hostel in the sweet little town of Salento. It was pouring buckets and the camping area was about 6″ deep in standing water. Dude, we are from SEATTLE; this doesn’t bother us in the slightest. We popped the top of the camper and the kids happily played with legos while we tried to eek out a wifi signal. Chris also took the shortest shower in the history of mankind because the temp started out hot and

Central Colombia, Part I: Zona Cafetera and Jungle Hot Springs.

On this trip we really haven’t given big cities a fair shake. We tend to roll up to the outskirts, take the briefest of peeks into the urban center, and then promptly get the heck out of dodge. We have missed countless museums, fabulous restaurants, and delightful shopping. Example A: Medellin, Colombia.    We had a slightly terrifying drive up to the campground though the city (Google Maps is not our friend – we should have listened to Garmin), tried